Hourly Minimum Wage to Increase by 20p

The National Minimum Wage is to increase by 20p per hour, the government announced recently. The rise will take effect from October, and will boost the minimum hourly rate that businesses can pay employees to £6.70 from the current level of £6.50. Prime Minister David Cameron claimed that this increase would provide minimum wage workers with “more financial security.”

Younger workers, who are subject to different rates, will also see an increase in the National Minimum Wage from October. Workers aged 18-29 will see minimum wage rise by 17p, taking the rate up to £5.30 from its current level of £5.13. 16-17 year olds will receive an 8p increase, from £3.79 at present to £3.87 after October. Overall, these increases represent a rise of roughly 3% for minimum wage workers in both the 18-20 and 21+ age categories, and 2% for those aged 16 and 17.

The biggest boost is being received by apprentices. This group is also subject to a separate minimum wage rate. Specifically, the minimum wage for apprentices is significantly lower. This fact is designed to reflect the fact they are receiving training and a qualification as well as monetary compensation for their work, but has nonetheless been criticised by many as too low to be liveable.

Currently, apprentices are subject to a minimum wage rate if £2.73 per hour, assuming they are in the first year of their apprenticeship or are under the age of 19. This will rise by 53p to £3.30 an hour from October. This is an increase of 20%, meaning that apprentices are receiving a proportionally much larger boost than those who are subject to other minimum wage rates.

The increases that have been announced for minimum wage rates are essentially in line with recommendations that have been made by the Low Pay Commission. The one area in which the government deviates from these recommendations is in the increase for apprentices. Where the Low Pay Commission recommended an increase of only 7p per hour, the government decided to introduce the significantly larger 57p increase to the minimum hourly rate.

The increase of 3% to be introduced for adult workers, meanwhile, is being hailed as the biggest minimum wage rise for seven years in real terms. Nonetheless, not all quarters are enthusiastic, with some believing that the increase should have been greater. Unions believe the rise will not be sufficient to tackle “in-work poverty,” while Labour points to the way that inflation has “eroded” the value of the minimum wage in recent years.

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