Osborne Calls Emergency “Stability” Budget

Following the Conservative victory in the UK’s general election, George Osborne has announced a new budget to be delivered on the 8th of July this year. The unusual move of delivering an extra budget is, he said, part of the government’s efforts to “deliver on the commitments we have made to working people” as soon as possible.

Previously, Osborne delivered the annual budget on the 18th of March. Through an article in national newspaper The Sun, he acknowledged that inserting an extra budget mid-year was an “unusual” step to take. However, he said that it was down to a desire to make “promises made in the election into a reality” with the minimum of delay.

The “stability budget” to be held in July will, Osborne claimed, concentrate with “a laser like focus” on improving UK living standards through raising economic productivity.

The chancellor has given a rough outline of the plans he expects to deliver in this budget in a conference outside 11 Downing Street. However, he would not yet go into any details of pertinent issues such as plans to make £12 billion worth of cuts to welfare. During the election campaign, the party provided details of how £2 billion worth of cuts would be achieved, but the remaining £10 billion remains unaccounted for in the details so far released.

While Osborne would not go into specifics about how the government’s goals would be achieved, he was happy to outline what the main goals are. The budget will, he said, represent a continuation of a “balanced plan” from the government to reform welfare, reduce government debts, and invest in the National Health Service. The welfare reforms, he said, would focus on efforts “to make work pay.” However, he refused to give any indication of where or how they would make the planned £12 billion of cuts to welfare funding. He only said that the government wanted to create “a welfare system that’s fair to the people who pay for it” but would “always protect the most vulnerable.”

Osborne also said that the government will increase NHS funding each year, continue cracking down on tax avoidance, and help to create new jobs including an extra three million apprenticeships.

Labour’s Caroline Flint, shadow secretary for energy and climate change, said that the Tory election campaign has involved a number of “uncosted promises.”

“It will be interesting,” Flint continued, “to see who is going to pay for those uncosted policies when they bring in the budget in July.”

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